MILL CREEK WATER DISTRICT    •    6415 Hickory Grove N    •    Quincy, IL 62305

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MILL CREEK WATER DISTRICT


Board Meeting is First Tuesday of the Month at 7:30 am





Tri-Township Fire Department will be testing fire hydrants in the district this Thursday and Friday which is June 17th and 18th.





Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for Calendar Year 2020

Mill Creek Water District


This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the water system to provide safe drinking water. This report includes drinking water facts, information on violations (if applicable), and contaminants detected in your drinking water supply during calendar year 2020. Each year, we will provide you a new report. If you need help understanding this report or have general questions, please contact the person listed below.



Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Contact Name:

Darin Huntley

Telephone Number:

(217) 224-9343

E-mail (if available)

millcreekwater@comcast.net



Sources of Drinking Water

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and groundwater wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.


Our source of water comes from 4 groundwater wells and a back-up water interconnect with purchased water from Quincy, IL.


Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.

  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.


Other Facts about Drinking Water

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.


In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.


Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).


If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.


Source Water Information


Source water name

Type of water

Report Status

CC 02-Meter Quincy (Seasonal)

SW

Active

Well 1

GW

Active

Well 2

GW

Active

Well 3

GW

Active

Well 4

GW

Active


Source Water Assessments


Source water protection (SWP) is a proactive approach to protecting our critical sources of public water supply and assuring that the best source of water is being utilized to serve the public. It involves implementation of pollution prevention practices to protect the water quality in a watershed or wellhead protection area serving a public water supply. Along with treatment, it establishes a multi-barrier approach to assuring clean and safe drinking water to the citizens of Illinois. The Illinois EPA has implemented a source water assessment program (SWAP) to assist with wellhead and watershed protection of public drinking water supplies.


We want our valued customers to be informed about their water quality. If you would like to learn more, please feel welcome to attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. The source water assessment for our supply has been completed by the Illinois EPA. If you would like a copy of this information, please stop by or call our office at (217) 224-9343.


To view a summary version of the completed Source Water Assessments, including: Importance of Source Water; Susceptibility to Contamination Determination; and documentation/recommendation of Source Water Protection Efforts, you may access the Illinois EPA website at http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swap-fact-sheets.pl.


Source of Water: MILL CREEK PWD to determine Mill Creek PWD's susceptibility to groundwater contamination, a Well Site Survey, published in 1986 by the Illinois EPA, was reviewed. During the survey of Mill Creek PWD's source water protection area, Illinois EPA staff recorded potential sources, routes, or possible problem sites within the 400 foot minimum setback zones, the 1,000 foot Phase I Wellhead Protection Area (WHPA), and the Phase II WHPA for Wells #1, #2, #3 and #4. The Phase II WHPA, also referred to as the recharge area, is the geographic area surrounding a well or a well field providing potable water to a community water supply as modeled using computer software to determine a five-year time of travel. Fourteen potential sources of groundwater contamination are present that could pose a hazard to groundwater pumped by the Mill Creek PWD community water supply wells. These include a pile of material, a quarrying of material, a mining other than sand/gravel or stone, a below ground fuel storage, a manufacturing process, a septic tank, an electrical generator/substation, a fertilizer warehouse, an exterminator, two lagoons, a well, an above ground fuel storage, and a pesticide/fertilizer commercial

application or warehouse. Approximately 60% (110 acres) of the Phase I and Phase II WHPAs is considered €œcultivated crops€, with the remaining percentage consisting of €œurban development€ and €œdeciduous forest€ (Figure 2). The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) describes this Land Resource Region as the Central Feed Grains and Livestock Region. Further, USDA classifies this Major Land Resource Area as the Central Mississippi Valley Wood Slopes, Northern Part. The Cl/Br vs. Cl ratio indicates non-point source agriculture fertilizer, as a possible source of nitrate in the area of the wells. As noted in previous sections, the nitrate concentrations for well #3 ranged from 5.58 - 9.0 mg/L. The sample data is from samples collected bi-monthly starting in November 2014 through November 2016. Figure 3 shows the overall chloride and nitrate concentration during the sample period. The Illinois EPA considers the source water of this system to be susceptible to contamination. This determination is based on a number of criteria including: the land-use activities in the recharge area of the wells, the available hydrogeologic data, monitoring conducted at the wells, and monitoring conducted at the entry point to the

distribution system. As noted above, the regional and local land use is primarily agriculture with some business, and the area around the wells is considered to have a €œvery high to moderately high€ potential for aquifer recharge. All public water supplies using groundwater are required to sample their wells monthly for bacterial contaminants. Sampling performed to assess for pathogenic contamination (e.g., virus, total coliform, e-coli) has also demonstrated that the source water is not susceptible to these types of contaminants.


Source of Water: Quincy, Illinois, EPA considers all surface water sources of community water supply to be susceptible to potential pollution problems, hence, the reason for mandatory treatment for all surface water supplies in Illinois. Mandatory treatment includes coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection. Within the Illinois portion of the Mississippi River Watershed, which is illustrated in Figure 3, many commodities, including manufactured goods, petrochemicals, and pesticides are transported along the river system. The production, storage, and transportation of these commodities are a major concern, especially when occurring near surface water intakes. In addition, agricultural runoff within the Illinois portion of the Mississippi River Basin contributes to the susceptibility of the Quincy intakes. With high flow rates and long distances of travel on the Mississippi River, critical areas can be extensive. The critical area for the Quincy intake was determined using data from a joint U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/U.S. Geological Survey project. This project used a computer modeling program (SPARROW) to determine travel times on major rivers in the United States. Accidental spills of hazardous materials into navigable waterways are a major concern because of their frequency in the United States in recent years. Illinois has access to 1,116 miles of inland waterway that can handle commercial barge traffic. These include the Upper Mississippi River, Illinois River Waterway, and the Ohio River. Along these waterways are numerous facilities that load and unload hazardous materials. Analysis of reported spills indicates that between 1974 and 1989, 794 accidental spills of hazardous materials occurred along Illinois waterways. Approximately 92% of these spills occurred along the Mississippi and/or the Illinois River. Figure 2 shows the critical area of concern (Zone 1)

for the Quincy surface water intake. Spills occurring in this critical area will travel to the intake in five hours or less, making contingency planning and

spill reporting a major concern in this watershed. Further information concerning spill response planning on the Mississippi River may be found in U.S.

EPAs website at www.epa.gov/region5/oil and at U.S. Geological Surveys website ftp://ftp.umesc.er.usgs.gov/pub/gis_data/oil_spill.




2020 Regulated Contaminants Detected


Here are a few definitions and scientific terms which will help you understand the information in the contaminant detection tables.


AL

Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Avg

Regulatory compliance with some MCLs is based on running annual average of monthly samples.

MCL

Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

MCLG

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

MRDL

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level: The highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water.

MRDLG

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal: The level of disinfectant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs allow for a margin of safety.

N/A

Not Applicable

NTU

Nephelometric Turbidity Units

pCi/L

picocuries per liter ( a measure of radioactivity)

ppb

Parts per billion or micrograms per liter (ug/L) - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

ppm

Parts per million or milligrams per liter (mg/L) - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.

TT

Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.


Lead and Copper



Date Sampled

MCLG

Action Level (AL)

90th Percentile

# Sites Over AL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Copper

2020

1.3

1.3

2.5

16

ppm

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives;

Corrosion of household plumbing systems;

Lead

2020

0

15

8.1

1

ppb

N

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.


If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Mill Creek Water District is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.


Water Quality Test Results


Disinfectants & Disinfection Byproducts

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Chlorine

12/31/2020

0.7

0.6 - 0.73

MRDLG = 4

MRDL = 4

ppm

N

Water additive to control microbes.

Haloacetic Acids

(HAA5)

2020

3

3.33 - 3.33

No goal for the total

60

ppb

N

By-product of drinking water disinfection.


Total Trihalomethanes

(TTHM)

2020

10

9.6 - 9.6

No goal for the total

80

ppb

N

By-product of drinking water disinfection.


Inorganic

Contaminants

Collection

Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Barium


04/03/2018

0.098

0.098 - 0.098

2

2

ppm

N

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

Chromium


04/03/2018

5.1

5.1 - 5.1

100

100

ppb

N

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits.

Fluoride


04/03/2018

0.641

0.641 - 0.641

4

4.0

ppm

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Manganese


2020

1.4

0 - 1.4

150

150

ppb

N

This contaminant is not currently regulated by the USEPA. However, the state regulates. Erosion of natural deposits.

Nitrate [measured as Nitrogen] - Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.

2020

10

0.66 - 10

10

10

ppm

N

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Selenium


04/03/2018

2

2 - 2

50

50

ppb

N

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines.

Sodium


04/03/2018

16

16 - 16



ppm

N

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits. Used in water softener regeneration.

Zinc


04/03/2018

0.017

0.017 - 0.017

5

5

ppm

N

This contaminant is not currently regulated by the USEPA. However, the state regulates. Naturally occurring; discharge from metal.

Radioactive

Contaminants

Collection

Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely source of Contamination.


Combined Radium

226/228

07/06/2015

0.308

0.308 - 0.308

0



N

Erosion of natural deposits.

Gross alpha excluding

radon and uranium

07/06/2015

1.82

1.82 - 1.82

0

15


N

Erosion of natural deposits.

Note: The state requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Therefore, some of this data may be more than one year old.



Violation Summary Table





Calendar Year 2020  Consumer Confidence Report  Quincy, Illinois

 

 

This report summarizes the quality of water that we provided last year, including details of where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. We are committed to providing you with this information because informed customers are our best allies.

 

 

This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the Department of Utilities to provide safe drinking water. This report includes drinking water facts and contaminants detected in your drinking water supply for the period of January 1 through December 31, 2020. Each year, we will provide you a new report. If you need help understanding this report or have general questions, please contact the person listed below.

 


Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe. Trauzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.



  Jeffrey Cont

  (217) 228-4527 

  jconte@quincyil.gov   


We want our valued customers to be informed about their water quality. If you would like to learn more, please feel welcome to attend any of our regularly scheduled Utilities Committee meetings. Utilities Committee meetings are held the first Thursday of each month at 4:00 PM in City Hall (730 Maine Street, Quincy, Illinois). Before we begin listing our unique water quality characteristics, here are some important facts you should know to help have a basic understanding of drinking water in general.

 

Sources of Drinking Water

 

Quincy water comes from the Mississippi River, which is a surface water. Illinois EPA considers all surface water sources of community water supply to be susceptible to potential pollution problems, hence, the reason for mandatory treatment for all surface water supplies in Illinois. Mandatory treatment includes coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection. Within the Illinois portion of the Mississippi River Watershed many commodities, including manufactured goods, petrochemicals, and pesticides are transported along the river system. The production, storage, and transportation of these commodities are a major concern, especially when occurring near surface water intakes. In addition, agricultural runoff within the Illinois portion of the Mississippi River Basin contributes to the susceptibility of the Quincy intakes. With high flow rates and long distances of travel on the Mississippi River, critical areas can be extensive. The critical area for the Quincy intake was determined using data from a joint U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/U.S. Geological Survey project. This project used a computer modeling program (SPARROW) to determine travel times on major rivers in the United States. Accidental spills of hazardous materials into navigable waterways are a major concern because of their frequency in the United States in recent years. Illinois has access to 1,116 miles of inland waterway that can handle commercial barge traffic. These include the Upper Mississippi River, Illinois River Waterway, and the Ohio River. Along these waterways are numerous facilities that load and unload hazardous materials. Analysis of reported spills indicate that between 1974 and 1989, 794 accidental spills of hazardous materials occurred along Illinois waterways. Approximately 92% of these spills occurred along the Mississippi and/or the Illinois River. A critical area of concern (Zone 1) for the Quincy surface water intake has been defined. Spills occurring in this critical area will travel to the intake in five hours or less, making contingency planning and spill reporting a major concern in this watershed. Further information concerning spill response planning on the Mississippi River may be found in U.S. EPAs website at www.epa.gov/region5/oil and at U.S. Geological Surveys website ftp://ftp.umesc.er.usgs.gov/pub/gis_data/oil_spill.

The source water assessment for our supply has been completed by the Illinois EPA. If you would like a copy of this information, please call the Department of Utilities. To view a summary version of the completed Source Water Assessments, including: Importance of Source Water; Susceptibility to Contamination Determination; and documentation/recommendation of Source Water Protection Efforts, you may access the Illinois EPA website at:

http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swap-fact-sheets.pl.

 

 

Page 1 of 6


Calendar Year 2020  Consumer Confidence Report  Quincy, Illinois

 

Other Facts about Drinking Water

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the USEPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in the source water include:

  Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.

  Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

  Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

  Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

  Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 2 of 6


Calendar Year 2020  Consumer Confidence Report  Quincy, Illinois

 

2020 Regulated Contaminants Detected

 

The next several tables summarize contaminants detected in your drinking water supply. Here are a few definitions and scientific terms which will help you understand the information in the contaminant detection tables.

 

 

Action Level (AL)

The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Action Level Goal (ALG)

The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety.

Avg

Regulatory compliance with some MCLs is based on running annual average of monthly samples.

Level 1 Assessment

A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.

Level 2 Assessment

A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL)

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG)

The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL)

The highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG)

The level of disinfectant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

N/A

Not Applicable

NTU

Nephelometric Turbidity Units

pCi/L

picocuries per liter ( a measure of radioactivity)

ppb

parts per billion or micrograms per liter (ug/L) - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

ppm

parts per million or milligrams per liter (mg/L) - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.

Treatment Technique or TT

A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

 

 

Page 3 of 6


Calendar Year 2020  Consumer Confidence Report  Quincy, Illinois

 

Lead and Copper

Date Sampled

 

MCLG

Action Level (AL)

90th Percentile

# Sites Over AL

 

Units

 

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Copper

 

2020

 

1.3

 

1.3

 

0.033

 

0

 

ppm

 

No

Corrosion  of  household  plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

 

Lead

 

2020

 

0

 

15

 

0.7

 

0

 

ppb

 

No

Corrosion  of  household  plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.

Disinfectants & Disinfection Byproducts

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

 

MCLG

 

MCL

 

Units

 

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

 

 

 

 

Water additive used to control microbes.

 

Chloramines

 

2020

 

3.1

 

3 - 4

MRDLG = 4

MRDL = 4

 

ppm

 

No

 

Haloaecetic acids (HAA5)

 

2020

 

27

 

4- 30

No goal for total

 

60

 

ppb

 

No

 

By-product of water disinfection.

 

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

 

2020

 

48

 

31 - 54

No goal for total

 

80

 

ppb

 

No

 

By-product of water disinfection

Note:  Compliance for Disinfection Byproducts (HAA5 and TTHM) is measured based on the running annual average, i.e. the average of all samples taken within the 12-month period preceding the sample date. The Highest Level Detected for Disinfection Byproducts (HAA5 and TTHM) is the highest of the running annual averages for 2020, not the highest single measurement.

Inorganic Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

 

MCLG

 

MCL

 

Units

 

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Barium

 

2020

 

0.91

 

0.91-0.91

 

2

 

2

 

ppb

 

No

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

 

Chromium

 

2020

 

2.3

 

2.3-2.3

 

100

 

100

 

ppb

 

No

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits

 

Cyanide

 

2020

 

3.6

 

3.6-3.6

 

200

 

200

 

ppb

 

No

Discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories; Discharge from steel/metal factories.

 

Fluoride

 

2020

 

0.56

 

0.41-0.56

 

4

 

 

4

 

ppm

 

No

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

 

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen)

 

2020

 

2.9

 

2.9-2.9

 

10

 

10

 

ppm

 

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits

 

Sodium

 

2020

 

15

 

15 - 15

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

ppm

 

No

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits; Used in water softener regeneration.

 

 

Page 4 of 6


Calendar Year 2020  Consumer Confidence Report  Quincy, Illinois

 

 

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

 

MCLG

 

MCL

 

Units

 

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

Combined Radium 226/228

2020

0.808

0.808 - 0.808

0

5

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

Note:  The state requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Therefore, some of this data may be more than one year old.

Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

 

MCLG

 

MCL

 

Units

 

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

2, 4-D

2020

0.1

0 - 0.1

10

10

ppb

No

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops.

Atrazine

2020

0.83

0.042-0.83

3

3

ppb

No

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops.

Turbidity

Limit (Treatment Technique)

 

Level Detected

 

Violation

 

Likely Source of Contamination

Highest Single Measurement

1 NTU

0.2 NTU

No

Soil Runoff

Lowest Monthly % Meeting Limit

0.3 NTU

100%

No

Soil Runoff

Note:  Turbidity is a measurement of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality and the effectiveness of our filtration system and disinfectants.

 

Total Organic Carbon

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 5 of 6


Calendar Year 2020  Consumer Confidence Report  Quincy, Illinois

 

Violations Table

The following table list all violations that occurred during 2020:

 

Contaminant or Program

Violation Type

Violation Duration Start Date - End Date

Violation Explanation

2, 4, 5-TP (Silvex)

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis. Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not your drinking water meets health standards. During the second quarter (April 1 through June 30) of 2020, required sampling for synthetic organic compounds was completed however the results were submitted to the Illinois EPA outside of the required time, which is a monitoring violation. Although the results were not reported in a timely manner, the second quarter sampling did not detect the presences of any of the synthetic organic compounds.

2, 4-D

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Alachlor

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Aldrin

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Atrazine

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Benzo (a) pyrene

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Carbonfuran

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Chlordane

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Dalapon

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Di (2-ethylhexyl) adipate

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Dibromochloropropane

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Dieldrin

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Dinoseb

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Diquat

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Endothall

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Endrin

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Ethylene dibromide

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Heptachlor

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Heptachlor epoxide

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Hexachlorobenzene

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Hexachlorocyclopentadiene

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Lindane

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Methoxychlor

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Oxamyl (Vydate)

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

PCBs (Polychlorinated biphenyls)

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Pentachlorophenol

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Picloram

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Simazine

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

Toxaphene

Monitoring, Routine Major

04/01/20 - 06/30/20

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MILL CREEK WATER DISTRICT    •    6415 Hickory Grove N    •    Quincy, IL 62305

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